Surgeons Migrate to ASCs as Surgeries Move to Ambulatory Settings

From OutpatientSurgery

It’s no secret that the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has challenged American health systems in ways that they are not used to being challenged. Many have had to adjust rapidly to best meet the needs of their patient population, while doing what they can to stay afloat financially. Among the most attractive solutions to this problem is the migration of procedures to ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs)

10 Big Challenges for ASCs

One year ago, many ASCs were closed or at limited case volume to divert resources to hospitals treating COVID-19 patients.A year later, the pandemic has had some silver lining in driving more cases outpatient, but there are several challenges ahead. ASC owners and operators will have to navigate their organizations through a new healthcare ecosystem emerging in the next 12 to 24 months.
From Becker’s ASC:

Ten challenges:

1. Boosting case volume. The COVID-19 pandemic, and other natural disasters last year, depressed ASC volume because centers temporarily shut their doors. While many ASCs have resumed operations, other factors are keeping them from reaching 100 percent capacity. Social distancing measures and lack of supplies force centers to lower their daily case volume. Unemployment in some areas will continue to challenge surgery centers, as patients don’t have access to insurance or necessary funds to undergo elective surgery. ASCs will need to find new ways to boost case volume, through facility expansion, adding services, employer partnerships or accepting alternative payment plans. Read more

December 4, 2020 — EndoSound Completes Successful Animal Study

EndoSound’s endoscopic ultrasound device  underwent  a  successful evaluation in a live animal (pig) lab.  The evaluator was Dr. Carlos Robles-Mendanda, an internationally known expert in the field and key opinion leader to major endoscope and equipment manufacturers.   He used the device without preparation or instruction.  The results of the two hour evaluation included:


  • The images were judged “excellent”, superior to the Olympus OEM1 competitive device
  • The ability to perform a diagnostic EUS examination was judged “perfect”
  • Doppler capability was “very good”
  • The ability to adapt to utilizing a new technology was judged “easy”
  • The addition of the EUS device to a standard endoscope did not affect the flexibility or maneuverability of the scope

In summary, the device was judged “fantastic”, “ready”, and “a final product”.

 

 

EndoSound Incorporates as a Delaware C Corporation

On June 1, 2020 — EndoSound incorporates as a Delaware C Corporation

Founded by gastroenterologist Stephen Steinberg, M.D., and bioengineer Scott Corbett, EndoSound is developing affordable, safer Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) systems for diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer and other diseases of the digestive tract. EUS combines endoscopy (a visual modality using video imaging) and ultrasound to create images of the digestive tract and its surrounding organs and tissues.